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INCLUDED SYSTEMS & GAMES

Every cabinet we create includes an extensive collection of over 60,000 separate titles, making it the ultimate destination for retro gaming.

What games you ask? Well, we include thousands upon thousands of retro games from all of your favorite developers such as Nintendo, SegaSNK, Namco, Atari, Capcom, Konami, NEC, Taito, Sony, Microsoft and so much more!

Want Donkey Kong? Check. Super Mario Bros 3? Check. After Burner the Arcade Game? Check. Pokemon Yellow for Gameboy Color? Check. Metal Gear Solid on PS1?! CHECK! We've got it all.

Check out our games list below to discover why Simple Arcade is the ultimate choice for any retro gaming enthusiast.

scroll through our full system lineup - or - search for your favorite game below!

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Acorn Archimedes

Acorn Archimedes

Retro Home Computer

99

games included

Acorn Archimedes is a family of personal computers designed by Acorn Computers of Cambridge, England. The systems are based on Acorn's own ARM architecture processors and the proprietary operating systems Arthur and RISC OS. The first models were introduced in 1987, and systems in the Archimedes family were sold until the mid-1990s.
America Laser Games

America Laser Games

Retro Home Console

10

games included

American Laser Games was a company based in Albuquerque, New Mexico that created numerous light gun laserdisc video games featuring live action full motion video.
Amstrad CPC

Amstrad CPC

Retro Home Computer

2332

games included

The Amstrad CPC (short for Color Personal Computer) is a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad between 1984 and 1990. It was designed to compete in the mid-1980s home computer market dominated by the Commodore 64 and the Sinclair ZX Spectrum, where it successfully established itself primarily in the United Kingdom, France, Spain, and the German-speaking parts of Europe.
Amstrad GX4000

Amstrad GX4000

Retro Home Console

24

games included

The Amstrad GX4000 was an 8-bit games console which was released by British computer company Amstrad in 1990. The console was released in the UK for £99 however its price started dropping within a few months due to such poor sales. Amstrad had already stopped producing the machine by this point, surely lamenting the money lost in their only games console venture. Due to this, many people claim that the Amstrad GX4000 is the least successful video games console ever made.
Apple II

Apple II

Retro Home Computer

764

games included

The Apple II series (trademarked with square brackets as "Apple ][" and rendered on later models as "Apple //") is a family of home computers, one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputer products, designed primarily by Steve Wozniak, manufactured by Apple Computer (now Apple Inc.), and launched in 1977 with the original Apple II.
Apple IIGS

Apple IIGS

Retro Home Computer

161

games included

The Apple IIGS (styled as IIgs), the fifth and most powerful of the Apple II family, is a 16-bit personal computer produced by Apple Computer. While featuring the Macintosh look and feel, and resolution and color similar to the Amiga and Atari ST, it remains compatible with earlier Apple II models. The "GS" in the name stands for "Graphics and Sound," referring to its enhanced multimedia hardware, especially its state-of-the-art audio.
Arcade Classics Collection

Arcade Classics Collection

Retro Arcade (Collection)

3076

games included

This collection is comprised of many of the most popular video arcade titles ever created.
Atari 2600

Atari 2600

Retro Home Console

555

games included

The Atari 2600 is a home video game console developed and produced by Atari, Inc. Released in September 1977, it popularized microprocessor -based hardware and games stored on swappable ROM cartridges, a format first used with the Fairchild Channel F in 1976.
Atari 5200

Atari 5200

Retro Home Console

73

games included

The Atari 5200 SuperSystem or simply Atari 5200 is a home video game console introduced in 1982 by Atari, Inc. as a higher-end complement for the popular Atari Video Computer System. The VCS was renamed to the Atari 2600 at the time of the 5200's launch.
Atari 7800

Atari 7800

Retro Home Console

58

games included

The Atari 7800 ProSystem, or simply the Atari 7800, is a home video game console officially released by the Atari Corporation in 1986. It is almost fully backward compatible with the Atari 2600, the first console to have backward compatibility without the use of additional modules. The 7800 has significantly improved graphics hardware over the 2600 but uses the same audio chip. It also shipped with a different model of joystick from the 2600-standard CX40.
Atari 800

Atari 800

Retro Home Computer

1508

games included

The Atari 800, an 8-bit computer released by Atari in 1979. Based off the MOS 6502 microprocessor and custom video and sound processors, the Atari 800 was the first in a line of popular home computers. Later models include the 600XL, 800XL 65XE and 130XE, which featured various amounts of memory and expansion capability.
Atari Jaguar

Atari Jaguar

Retro Home Console

56

games included

The Atari Jaguar is a home video game console developed by Atari Corporation and released in North America in November 1993. Part of the fifth generation of video game consoles, it competed with the 16-bit Sega Genesis, the Super NES and the 32-bit 3DO Interactive Multiplayer that launched the same year. Powered by two custom 32-bit processors — Tom and Jerry — in addition to a Motorola 68000, Atari marketed it as the world's first 64-bit game system, emphasizing its 64-bit bus used by the blitter. The Jaguar launched with Cybermorph as the pack-in game, which received divisive reviews. The system's library ultimately comprised only 50 licensed games.
Atari Jaguar CD

Atari Jaguar CD

Retro Home Console

8

games included

The Atari Jaguar CD is a CD-ROM peripheral for the Jaguar video game console. Atari announced a CD-ROM drive for the Jaguar before the console's November 1993 launch. Codenamed Jaguar II during development, the Jaguar CD was released on September 21, 1995 for US $149.95 .
Atari Lynx

Atari Lynx

Retro Handheld Console

76

games included

The Atari Lynx is a hybrid 8/16-bit fourth generation handheld game console released by Atari Corporation in September 1989 in North America and 1990 in Europe and Japan. It was the first handheld game console with a color liquid-crystal display .
Atari ST

Atari ST

Retro Home Computer

1056

games included

The Atari ST is a line of personal computers from Atari Corporation and the successor to the Atari 8-bit family. The initial model, the Atari 520ST, had limited release in April–June 1985 and was widely available in July.
BBC Microcomputer System

BBC Microcomputer System

Retro Home Computer

1196

games included

The British Broadcasting Corporation Microcomputer System, or BBC Micro, is a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by Acorn Computers in the 1980s for the BBC Computer Literacy Project. Designed with an emphasis on education, it was notable for its ruggedness, expandability, and the quality of its operating system.
Bally Astrocade

Bally Astrocade

Retro Home Console

46

games included

The Bally Astrocade (also known as Bally Arcade or initially as Bally ABA-1000) is a second-generation home video game console and simple computer system designed by a team at Midway, at that time the videogame division of Bally.
Bandai WonderSwan

Bandai WonderSwan

Retro Handheld Console

107

games included

The Bandai WonderSwan was a line of handheld game consoles first released in Japan in 1999 and considered part of the fifth generation of video game consoles. Its competitors were initially the Neo Geo Pocket Color and the market leader Nintendo’s Game Boy Color.
Bandai WonderSwan Color

Bandai WonderSwan Color

Retro Handheld Console

90

games included

The Bandai WonderSwan was a line of handheld game consoles first released in Japan in 1999 and considered part of the fifth generation of video game consoles. Originally a monchrome console, the WonderSwan Color was released in 2000 and could play the existing games for the original WonderSwan.
Big Fish Games

Big Fish Games

PC Games

14

games included

Big Fish Games is a casual gaming company based in Seattle, with a regional office in Oakland, California, owned by Aristocrat Leisure. It is a developer and distributor of casual games for computers and mobile devices.
Casio PV-1000

Casio PV-1000

Retro Home Console

13

games included

The PV-1000 was released in October 1983. It was only released in Japan where it sold for 14,800 yen. Casio failed to achieve a significant market share. According to retrogames.co.uk the console was pulled after several weeks due to low sales.
ColecoVision

ColecoVision

Retro Home Console

146

games included

The ColecoVision is Coleco's second generation home video game console, which was released in August 1982. The ColecoVision offered near-arcade-quality graphics and gaming style along with the means to expand the system's basic hardware. Released with a catalog of 12 launch titles, with an additional 10 games announced for 1982, approximately 145 titles in total were published as ROM cartridges for the system between 1982 and 1984. River West Brands currently owns the ColecoVision brand name.
Commodore 64

Commodore 64

Retro Home Computer

1043

games included

The Commodore 64, also known as the C64, is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore. It has been listed in the Guinness World Records as the highest-selling single computer model of all time, with independent estimates placing the number sold between 12.5 and 17 million units.
Commodore Amiga

Commodore Amiga

Retro Home Computer

2029

games included

Amiga is a family of personal computers introduced by Commodore in 1985. The original model is one of a number of mid-1980s computers with 16- or 16/32-bit processors, 256 KB or more of RAM, mouse-based GUIs, and significantly improved graphics and audio compared to previous 8-bit systems.
Commodore Amiga CD32

Commodore Amiga CD32

Retro Home Console

159

games included

The Amiga CD32 (stylized as Amiga CD32, code-named "Spellbound") is a 32-bit home video game console developed by Commodore and released in Europe, Australia, Canada, and Brazil. It was first announced at the Science Museum in London on July 16, 1993, and was released in September of the same year.
Commodore PET

Commodore PET

Retro Home Computer

389

games included

The Commodore PET is a line of personal computers produced starting in 1977 by Commodore International. A single all-in-one case combines a MOS Technology 6502 microprocessor, Commodore BASIC in read-only memory, keyboard, monochrome monitor, and, in early models, a cassette deck.
Commodore Plus 4

Commodore Plus 4

Retro Home Computer

563

games included

The Commodore Plus/4 is a home computer released by Commodore International in 1984. The "Plus/4" name refers to the four-application ROM-resident office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, database, and graphing); it was billed as "the productivity computer with software built in".
Commodore VIC-20

Commodore VIC-20

Retro Home Computer

140

games included

The VIC-20 (known as the VC-20 in Germany and the VIC-1001 in Japan) is an 8-bit home computer that was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore's first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units. It was described as "one of the first anti-spectatorial, non-esoteric computers by design...no longer relegated to hobbyist/enthusiasts or those with money, the computer Commodore developed was the computer of the future.
Daphne

Daphne

Retro Arcade

16

games included

Daphne-is a Free laserdisc game emulator that allows one to play real laserdisc arcade games such as Dragon's Lair and Space Ace on one's PC. It is the First Ever Multiple Arcade Laserdisc Emulator! It's a program that lets one play the original versions of many laserdisc arcade games on one's PC.
Emerson Arcadia 2001

Emerson Arcadia 2001

Retro Home Console

16

games included

The Arcadia 2001 is a second-generation 8-bit home video game console released by Emerson Radio in May 1982 for a price of US$ 99, several months before the release of ColecoVision. It was discontinued only 18 months later, with a total of 35 games having been released. Emerson licensed the Arcadia 2001 to Bandai, which released it in Japan. Over 30 Arcadia 2001 clones exist.
Entex Adventure Vision

Entex Adventure Vision

Retro Home Console

4

games included

Adventure Vision is a cartridge-based video game console released by Entex Industries in either August or October 1982. The launch price of the system was $79.95. The monitor, game controls, and computer hardware are all contained within a single portable unit. The LED monitor can only display red pixels. Four games were released, all of which are arcade ports.
Epoch Super Cassette Vision

Epoch Super Cassette Vision

Retro Home Console

31

games included

The Super Cassette Vision is a home video game console made by Epoch Co. and released in Japan on July 17, 1984, and in Europe, specifically France, later in 1984. A successor to the Cassette Vision, it competed with Nintendo's Family Computer and Sega's SG-1000 line in Japan.
Fairchild Channel F

Fairchild Channel F

Retro Home Console

28

games included

The Fairchild Channel F, short for "Channel Fun", is a video game console, the first to be based on a microprocessor and to use ROM cartridges instead of having games built-in. It was released by Fairchild Camera and Instrument in November 1976 across North America at a retail price of US$169.95 (equivalent to $810 in 2021).
Final Burn Neo

Final Burn Neo

Retro Arcade

2102

games included

FinalBurn Neo is an active fork of the FinalBurn Alpha emulator, created by many of the former FBA developers.
GCE Vectrex

GCE Vectrex

Retro Home Console

23

games included

The Vectrex is a vector display-based video game console that was developed by Smith Engineering/Western Technologies. It was licensed and distributed first by GCE, and then by Milton Bradley after their purchase of GCE.
Magnavox Odyssey 2

Magnavox Odyssey 2

Retro Home Console

71

games included

The Magnavox Odyssey 2 (stylized as Magnavox Odyssey²), also known as Philips Odyssey 2, is a second-generation home video game console that was released in 1978. It was sold in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil and Peru as the Philips Odyssey and in Japan as Odyssey2. The Odyssey 2 was one of the four major home consoles prior to the 1983 video game market crash, along with Atari 2600, Intellivision and ColecoVision.
Mattel Intellivision

Mattel Intellivision

Retro Home Console

134

games included

Mattel Intellivision The Mattel Intellivision is a console developed by Mattel. It was released in 1979. This system scrapes metadata for the “intellivision” group and loads the intellivision set from the currently selected theme, if available.
Mega Duck

Mega Duck

Retro Handheld Console

24

games included

The Mega Duck WG-108 (also known as Cougar Boy) is a handheld game console that was developed and manufactured by Hong Kong-based Welback Holdings through its Timlex International division, and released in 1993.
Microsft XBOX

Microsft XBOX

Retro Home Console

134

games included

The Xbox is a home video game console manufactured by Microsoft that is the first installment in the Xbox series of video game consoles.
Microsoft MSX

Microsoft MSX

Retro Home Computer

527

games included

MSX represents a hybrid of a videogame console and a generic CP/M-80 machine. Its main CPU is a Zilog Z80A running at 3.58MHz. The video subsystem is built around a TMS9918 or TMS9928 VDP chip, which was also used in the Texas Instruments TI-99/4, Colecovision, and Coleco Adam computers.
Microsoft MSX2

Microsoft MSX2

Retro Home Computer

149

games included

MSX represents a hybrid of a videogame console and a generic CP/M-80 machine. Its main CPU is a Zilog Z80A running at 3.58MHz. The video subsystem is built around a TMS9918 or TMS9928 VDP chip, which was also used in the Texas Instruments TI-99/4, Colecovision, and Coleco Adam computers.
Microsoft XBOX 360

Microsoft XBOX 360

Retro Home Console

21

games included

The Xbox 360 is a home video game console developed by Microsoft. As the successor to the original Xbox, it is the second console in the Xbox series.
NEC PC Engine

NEC PC Engine

Retro Home Console

288

games included

The PC Engine is a video game console originally released by NEC Home Electronics in Japan in October 1987. It stands as NEC's first foray into the lucrative video games market, becoming a joint venture with Hudson Soft, creator of the system's primary form of media, the HuCard.
NEC PC Engine-CD

NEC PC Engine-CD

Retro Home Console

118

games included

The PC Engine-CD is an add-on for the PC Engine allowing the console to run games from CD-ROMs. It was originally released in North America in 1990, as the Western counterpart to the PC Engine's CD-ROM².
NEC PC-FX

NEC PC-FX

Retro Home Console

52

games included

The PC-FX is a 32-bit home video game console developed by NEC and Hudson Soft. It was released in 1994 and discontinued in February 1998, as NEC's final home video game console. Based on the NEC V810 CPU and CD-ROM, it was intended as the successor to the PC Engine (known overseas as the TurboGrafx-16). Unlike its predecessor, the PC-FX was only released in Japan.
NEC TurboGrafx-16

NEC TurboGrafx-16

Retro Home Console

94

games included

The TurboGrafx-16 is a video game console originally released by NEC Home Electronics in Japan in October 1987. It stands as NEC's first foray into the lucrative video games market, becoming a joint venture with Hudson Soft, creator of the system's primary form of media, the HuCard.
NEC TurboGrafx-CD

NEC TurboGrafx-CD

Retro Home Console

39

games included

The TurboGrafx-CD is an add-on for the TurboGrafx-16 allowing the console to run games from CD-ROMs. It was originally released in North America in 1990, as the Western counterpart to the PC Engine's CD-ROM².
Nintendo 64

Nintendo 64

Retro Home Console

393

games included

The Nintendo 64 (N64) is a home video game console developed by Nintendo. The successor to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, it was released on June 23, 1996, in Japan, on September 29, 1996, in North America, and on March 1, 1997, in Europe and Australia. It was the last major home console to use cartridges as its primary storage format until the Nintendo Switch in 2017. It competed primarily with the Sony PlayStation and the Sega Saturn.
Nintendo 64DD

Nintendo 64DD

Retro Home Console

19

games included

The 64DD is a magnetic floppy disk drive peripheral for the Nintendo 64 game console developed by Nintendo. It was announced in 1995, prior to the Nintendo 64's 1996 launch, and after numerous delays was released in Japan on December 13, 1999.
Nintendo DS

Nintendo DS

Retro Handheld Console

1141

games included

The Nintendo DS is a handheld game console produced by Nintendo, released globally across 2004 and 2005. The DS, an initialism for "Developers' System" or "Dual Screen", introduced distinctive new features to handheld games: two LCD screens working in tandem (the bottom one being a touchscreen), a built-in microphone and support for wireless connectivity. Both screens are encompassed within a clamshell design similar to the Game Boy Advance SP. The Nintendo DS also features the ability for multiple DS consoles to directly interact with each other over Wi-Fi within a short range without the need to connect to an existing wireless network. Alternatively, they could interact online using the now-defunct Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service. Its main competitor was Sony's PlayStation Portable during the seventh generation of video game consoles.
Nintendo Entertainment System

Nintendo Entertainment System

Retro Home Console

1117

games included

The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), an 8-bit third-generation home video game console produced by Nintendo, had numerous model variants produced throughout its lifetime. It was originally released in 1983 as the Family Computer[a] (and widely known as the Famicom) in Japan, with design work led by Masayuki Uemura. Nintendo intentionally redesigned it as the NES in North America in an attempt to avoid the stigma of video game consoles lingering from the video game crash the same year; while it was initially conceptualized as a home computer, it was ultimately modeled after a videocassette recorder (VCR) for its debut there in 1985. Nintendo subsequently exported the NES to Europe and Oceania via local distributors.
Nintendo Famicom Disk System

Nintendo Famicom Disk System

Retro Home Console

176

games included

The Family Computer Disk System, commonly shortened to the Famicom Disk System or just Disk System, is a peripheral for Nintendo's Family Computer home video game console, released only in Japan on February 21, 1986. It uses proprietary floppy disks called "Disk Cards" for cheaper data storage and it adds a new high-fidelity sound channel for supporting Disk System games.
Nintendo Game Boy

Nintendo Game Boy

Retro Handheld Console

477

games included

The Game Boy is an 8-bit fourth generation handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. It was first released in Japan on April 21, 1989, in North America later the same year, and in Europe in late 1990.
Nintendo Game Boy Advance

Nintendo Game Boy Advance

Retro Handheld Console

973

games included

The Game Boy Advance (GBA) is a 32-bit handheld game console developed, manufactured and marketed by Nintendo as the successor to the Game Boy Color. It was released in Japan on March 21, 2001, in North America on June 11, 2001, in the PAL region on June 22, 2001, and in mainland China as iQue Game Boy Advance on June 8, 2004. The GBA is part of the sixth generation of video game consoles. The original model does not have an illuminated screen; Nintendo addressed that with the release of a redesigned model with a frontlit screen, the Game Boy Advance SP, in 2003. A newer revision of the redesign was released in 2005, with a backlit screen. Around the same time, the final redesign, the Game Boy Micro, was released in September 2005.
Nintendo Game Boy Color

Nintendo Game Boy Color

Retro Handheld Console

441

games included

The Game Boy Color (commonly abbreviated as GBC) is a handheld game console, manufactured by Nintendo, which was released in Japan on October 21, 1998 and to international markets that November. It is the successor to the Game Boy and is part of the Game Boy product line. The GBC features a color screen rather than monochrome, but it is not backlit. It is slightly thicker and taller and features a slightly smaller screen than the Game Boy Pocket, its immediate predecessor in the Game Boy line. As with the original Game Boy, it has a custom 8-bit processor made by Sharp that is considered a hybrid between the Intel 8080 and the Zilog Z80. The American English spelling of the system's name, Game Boy Color, remains consistent throughout the world.
Nintendo GameCube

Nintendo GameCube

Retro Home Console

120

games included

The GameCube is a home video game console developed and released by Nintendo in Japan on September 14, 2001, in North America on November 18, 2001, and in PAL territories in 2002. It is the successor to the Nintendo 64 (1996), and predecessor of the Wii (2006). In the sixth generation of video game consoles, the GameCube competed with Sony's PlayStation 2 and Microsoft's Xbox. Flagship games include Super Smash Bros. Melee, Luigi's Mansion, Super Mario Sunshine, Metroid Prime, Mario Kart: Double Dash, Pikmin, Pikmin 2, The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, Chibi-Robo!, and Animal Crossing.
Nintendo Pokemon Mini

Nintendo Pokemon Mini

Retro Handheld Console

11

games included

The Pokémon Mini (officially stylized as Pokémon mini) is a handheld game console that was designed and manufactured by Nintendo and themed around the Pokémon media franchise. It is the smallest game system with interchangeable cartridges ever produced by Nintendo, weighing just under two and a half ounces (71 grams). It was first released in North America on November 16, 2001, (two days before the GameCube was released) then in Japan on December 14, 2001, and in Europe on March 15, 2002. The systems were released in three colors: Wooper Blue, Chikorita Green, and Smoochum Purple.
Nintendo Satellaview

Nintendo Satellaview

Retro Home Console

83

games included

The Satellaview is a satellite modem peripheral produced by Nintendo for the Super Famicom in 1995. Containing 1 megabyte of ROM space and an additional 512 kB of RAM, Satellaview allowed players to download games, magazines, and other media through satellite broadcasts provided by Japanese company St.GIGA. Its heavy third-party support included Squaresoft, Taito, Konami, Capcom, and Seta. To use Satellaview, players purchased a special broadcast satellite (BS) tuner directly from St.GIGA or rented one for a six-month fee, and paid monthly subscription fees to both St.GIGA and Nintendo. It attaches to the expansion port on the bottom of the Super Famicom.
Nintendo Sufami Turbo

Nintendo Sufami Turbo

Retro Home Console

13

games included

The SuFami Turbo, often compared to the Aladdin Deck Enhancer, is an accessory released by Bandai for Nintendo's Super Famicom system and was released in 1996.
Nintendo Super Famicom

Nintendo Super Famicom

Retro Home Console

1440

games included

The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES), commonly shortened to Super NES or Super Nintendo, is a 16-bit home video game console developed by Nintendo that was released in 1990 in Japan and South Korea, 1991 in North America, 1992 in Europe and Oceania, and 1993 in South America. In Japan, it is called the Super Famicom (SFC). In South Korea, it is called the Super Comboy and was distributed by Hyundai Electronics. The system was released in Brazil on August 30, 1993, by Playtronic. Although each version is essentially the same, several forms of regional lockout prevent cartridges for one version from being used in other versions.
Nintendo Virtual Boy

Nintendo Virtual Boy

Retro Handheld Console

16

games included

The Virtual Boy is a 32-bit tabletop portable video game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. Released in 1995, it was marketed as the first console capable of displaying stereoscopic "3D" graphics.
Nintendo Wii

Nintendo Wii

Retro Home Console

45

games included

The Wii is a home video game console developed and marketed by Nintendo. It was released on November 19, 2006, in North America and in December 2006 for most other regions of the world. It is Nintendo's fifth major home game console.
Nintendo Wii-U

Nintendo Wii-U

Retro Handheld Console

28

games included

The Wii U is a home video game console developed by Nintendo as the successor to the Wii. Released in late 2012, it is the first eighth-generation video game console and competed with Microsoft's Xbox One and Sony's PlayStation 4.
PC Engine SuperGrafx

PC Engine SuperGrafx

PC Games

5

games included

The PC Engine SuperGrafx, also known as simply the SuperGrafx, is a fourth-generation home video game console manufactured by NEC Home Electronics and released in Japan in 1989.
PC Games

PC Games

PC Games

2

games included

A personal computer game, also known as computer game or abbreviated PC game, is a electronic game played on a personal computer (PC) and form of video game. Its defining characteristics include: more diverse and user-determined gaming hardware and software; and generally greater capacity in input, processing, video and audio output.
Panasonic 3DO

Panasonic 3DO

Retro Home Console

167

games included

The 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, also referred to as simply 3DO, is a home video game console developed by The 3DO Company. Conceived by entrepreneur and Electronic Arts founder Trip Hawkins, the 3DO was not a console manufactured by the company itself, but a set of specifications, originally designed by Dave Needle and Robert J. Mical of New Technologies Group, that could be licensed by third parties. Panasonic produced the first models in 1993, and further renditions of the hardware were released in 1994 by GoldStar (now LG Electronics), and in 1995 by Sanyo.
Philips CD-i

Philips CD-i

Retro Home Console

114

games included

The Compact Disc-Interactive (CD-I, later CD-i) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was mostly developed and marketed by Dutch company Philips. It was created as an extension of CDDA and CD-ROM and specified in the Green Book specifications, co-developed by Philips and Sony, to combine audio, text and graphics. The two companies initially expected to impact the education/training, point of sale, and home entertainment industries, but CD-i eventually became best known for its video games.
Philips Videopac+ G7400

Philips Videopac+ G7400

Retro Home Computer

24

games included

The Philips Videopac+ G7400 is a third-generation home video game console released in limited quantities in 1983, and only in Europe; an American release as the Odyssey³ Command Center was planned but never occurred. The G7400 was the successor to the Philips Videopac G7000
Pico-8

Pico-8

PC Games

4000

games included

PICO-8 is a virtual machine and game engine created by Lexaloffle Games. It is a fantasy video game console that mimics the limited graphical and sound capabilities of 8-bit systems of the 1980s.
Pinball FX2

Pinball FX2

Pinball

60

games included

Pinball FX2 is the premiere pinball platform for Windows 10, offering an exciting library of original pinball tables featuring the hottest brands in entertainment like Star Wars, ALIEN and Marvel!
Pinball FX3

Pinball FX3

Pinball

99

games included

Pinball FX3 is the biggest, most community focused pinball game ever created. Multiplayer matchups, user generated tournaments and league play create endless opportunity for pinball competition.
PopCap

PopCap

PC Games

47

games included

PopCap games are sprinkled with a whirlwind of smile-inducing awesomeness and polished to a shiny sheen that keeps the world coming back again and again. And best of all, you’ll find our games on mobile, console, PC, and many other devices – you may even be able to play them on the moon!
RCA Studio II

RCA Studio II

Retro Home Console

15

games included

The RCA Studio II is a home video game console made by RCA that debuted in January 1977. The graphics of Studio II games were black and white and resembled those of earlier Pong consoles and their clones.
SNK Neo Geo AES

SNK Neo Geo AES

Retro Home Console

117

games included

The Neo Geo, stylized as NEO•GEO and also written as NEOGEO, is a ROM cartridge-based arcade system board and fourth generation home video game console released on April 26, 1990, by Japanese game company SNK Corporation. It was the first system in SNK's Neo Geo family.
SNK Neo Geo CD

SNK Neo Geo CD

Retro Home Console

99

games included

The Neo Geo CD is the second home video game console of SNK Corporation's Neo Geo family, released on September 9, 1994, four years after its cartridge-based equivalent. This is the same platform, converted to the cheaper CD format retailing at $49 to 79 per title, compared to the $300 cartridges. The system was originally priced at US$399, or £399. The system can also play Audio CDs. All three versions of the system have no region-lock. The Neo Geo CD was launched bundled with a control pad instead of a joystick like the AES version. However, the original AES joystick can be used with all three Neo Geo CD models.
SNK Neo Geo MVS

SNK Neo Geo MVS

Retro Arcade

139

games included

The Neo Geo, stylized as NEO•GEO and also written as NEOGEO, is a ROM cartridge-based arcade system board and fourth generation home video game console released on April 26, 1990, by Japanese game company SNK Corporation. It was the first system in SNK's Neo Geo family. The Neo Geo originally launched as the Multi Video System (MVS) coin-operated arcade machine. With its games stored on self-contained cartridges, a game cabinet can easily be changed to a different game title by swapping the game's cartridge and cabinet artwork. The MVS offers owners the ability to put up to six different cartridges into a single cabinet, a unique feature that was a key economic consideration for operators with limited floorspace, as well as saving money long term.
SNK Neo Geo Pocket

SNK Neo Geo Pocket

Retro Handheld Console

9

games included

The Neo Geo Pocket is a monochrome handheld game console released by SNK. It was the company's first handheld system and is part of the Neo Geo family. It debuted in Japan in late 1998 but never saw an American release, being exclusive to Japan, Asia and Europe.
SNK Neo Geo Pocket Color

SNK Neo Geo Pocket Color

Retro Handheld Console

37

games included

The Neo Geo Pocket is a monochrome handheld game console released by SNK. It was the company's first handheld system and is part of the Neo Geo family. It debuted in Japan in late 1998 but never saw an American release, being exclusive to Japan, Asia and Europe. The Neo Geo Pocket received lower than expected sales and it was discontinued in 1999, immediately being succeeded by the Neo Geo Pocket Color, a full color device allowing the system to compete more easily with the dominant Game Boy Color handheld, and which also saw an American release. Though the system enjoyed only a short life, there were some significant games released on the system such as Samurai Shodown, and King of Fighters R-1.
Sammy Atomiswave

Sammy Atomiswave

Retro Arcade

23

games included

The Atomiswave is a custom arcade system board and cabinet from Sammy Corporation. It is based on Sega's Dreamcast console, sharing similarities with the NAOMI, as far as it uses interchangeable game cartridges, as well as a removable module for changing the control scheme (including dual joysticks, dual light guns and a steering wheel), but unlike the NAOMI, the Atomiswave does not feature expanded RAM compared to the Dreamcast.
ScummVM

ScummVM

PC Games

382

games included

Script Creation Utility for Maniac Mansion Virtual Machine (ScummVM) is a set of game engine recreations. Originally designed to play LucasArts adventure games that use the SCUMM system, it also supports a variety of non-SCUMM games by companies like Revolution Software and Adventure Soft. It was originally written by Ludvig Strigeus. Released under the terms of the GNU General Public License, ScummVM is free software.
Sega 32X

Sega 32X

Retro Home Console

34

games included

The 32X is an add-on for the Sega Genesis video game console. Codenamed "Project Mars", it was designed to expand the power of the Genesis and serve as a transitional console into the 32-bit era until the release of the Sega Saturn. The 32X uses its own ROM cartridges and has its own library of games. It was distributed under the name Super 32X in Japan and South Korea, Genesis 32X in North America, Mega 32X in Brazil, and Mega Drive 32X in all other regions.
Sega CD

Sega CD

Retro Home Console

158

games included

The Sega CD, released as the Mega-CD in most regions outside North America and Brazil, is a CD-ROM accessory for the Sega Genesis produced by Sega as part of the fourth generation of video game consoles. It was released on December 12, 1991, in Japan, October 15, 1992, in North America, and April 2, 1993, in Europe. The Sega CD plays CD games and adds hardware functionality such as a faster CPU and graphic enhancements such as sprite scaling and rotation. It can also play audio CDs and CD+G discs.
Sega CD 32X

Sega CD 32X

Retro Home Console

6

games included

The 32X is an add-on for the Sega Genesis video game console. Codenamed "Project Mars", it was designed to expand the power of the Genesis and serve as a transitional console into the 32-bit era until the release of the Sega Saturn. The 32X uses its own ROM cartridges and has its own library of games.
Sega Dreamcast

Sega Dreamcast

Retro Home Console

137